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are excited to host this event with harvard university and google. today's topic is innovation and education. we cannot get any better speakers for today's events. as washington is focused on the fiscal cliff and other issues are around the budget and long- term fiscal discipline, one may wonder why we're having an event on education. we are doing it because these issues are inextricably linked. insurers the united states is maintaining its edge in the global economy. america is role is central to that competitiveness. that has not just happened by happenstance. it has been the work led by the private sector but decisions that have been critical to that success. we look at the questions around the united states fiscal discipline. we wanted to make sure that we have some discussion about the assessment we made in the role of issues that are not always at the forefront. the vital role america's universities have played. the fact that our institutions of higher learning are the best in the world and people from around the world want to come to the united states to be our next generation of on j
'll have an update. later some harvard students have started a bondage club and they want the university to pay for it. why not? might be sadistic. coming right back. >> bill: facing to follow up segment tonight, new rasmussen survey released this week says 68% of american adults prefer the greeting merry christmas this time of year. just 23% like happy holidays. michigan federal appeals court has reversed decision that banned nativity display folks in warrant, michigan put up a crest. atheists complained, nativity was removed. group defeated the atheist and we love that and now it's back. jewish guy thinks the whole war on christmas is insane. you say that for quite some time, mr. stein, right? >> i have. you can call me ben. i'm jewish. all of my ancestors are jewish. my son is jewish. i don't mind people saying merry christmas to me. i like calling it a christmas tree. it's a christmas holiday. it's a christian holiday. it's not a holiday, holiday. it's on not a atheist holiday but a christian holiday. >> it's a holiday that atheists can celebrate certainly under the banner. >> absolu
of the culture war over christmas. we'll have an update. later some harvard students have started a bondage club and they want the university to pay for it. why not? might be sadistic. coming right back. [ male announcer ] we all make bad decisions. like say, gas station sushi. cheap is good. and sushi, good. but cheap sushi, not so good. it's like that super-low rate on not enough car insurance. pretty sketchy. ♪ and then there are the good decisions. like esurance. their coverage counselor tool helps you choose the right coverage for you at a great price. [ stomach growls ] without feeling queasy. that's insurance for the modern world. esurance. now backed by allstate. click or call. >> bill: facing to follow up segment tonight, new rasmussen survey released this week says 68% of american adults prefer the greeting merry christmas this time of year. just 23% like happy holidays. michigan federal appeals court has reversed decision that banned nativity display folks in warrant, michigan put up a crest. atheists complained, nativity was removed. group defeated the atheist and we love that and
was a student at harvard, and three other guys who who had recently graduated and were doing what they could to help the cause of freedom and liberty against the forces of nazi fascism speaks that he was studying at harvard at the time. what was he studying and what was his life projector at that point? >> well, he, like his four brothers had grown up in new jersey and vermont where his family had had property for quite, several generations. he went to prep school at st. paul school where he distinguished himself as a student and as a student leader and as an athlete. and like all his brothers in his uncles and his grandfather's before him he went off to harvard. he was quite literary. he was a good writer. he was known as a good writer, and when he went to war he kept journals and wrote wonderful letters which i hunted up and explored to find a really the story of what happened to him when he went to war. i knew growing up that he had been killed. by the time i was, became of age of course he was gone. he was killed in 1943 in tunisia. and that's pretty much all i knew about him, except for
of a two-story dwelling unit for a child-care facility located at 281 harvard street the project sponsor currently operates the polka dot center in bernal heights. the proposed facility would open monday-through friday, and would be operated by three full-time employees. no physical expansion of the existing building is proposed. this project was originally scheduled november 15th but knew to neighbor concerns the project was continued until today to allow the project sponsor an opportunity to work with the neighbors to address concerns. a community meeting was held november 17th. this were 30 people in attendance. some issues raised were regarding parking and traffic and the necessity and desirable of a preschool in the neighborhood and commercial uses in the neighborhood. to address parking and traffic concerns from the neighbors, staff has added a condition of approval that the project sponsor shall apply for a white passenger loading zone. along the 50' street frontage in front of the entrance to the facility. this loading zone would be activity during one-hour drop-off zone and on
tore get into america's top colleges. this past spring, harvard and princeton posted record-low acceptance rates with harvard admitting just 2,000 of the 34,000 applicants, a rate of 5.9%. 5.9! really? because i calculated that myself, and it's 2,000, 34, 000, like that, and i i got will be boobies. ( laughter ). now, no wonder worried parents spend thousands on s.a.t. prep courses, math tudors, english tudors, mandarin lessons, not to pad the child's resume but so it can claw out the eyes of the competition. good luck filling out your application now. now, luckily, there is a much simpler way to give kids a leg up. and it brings us to tonight's word ( cheers and applause ) higher learning nation, you can get the best tutor money can buy, but ultimately, there's always going to be one thing standing in the way of your kid's potential. that obstacle-- your kid. because after giving them every possible advantage, many parents fiend out their kid doesn't get into hafer or princeton. what are they supposed to do, have their kid packed off to some technical school? folks, that's
a whole chapter on yale and harvard in the book and i mentioned in one case since i'm so used to these cases at this point i'm kind of surprised at how powerful their response was. this was a case where harvard and yale have the game and that's why they play than in football. this is funny thing it is such a big deal but they like to make fun of each other and they have pretty crude slogans plastered on them on t-shirts to make fun of each other. one of them is you can't spell harvard without vd. [laughter] and in 2009 they decided to go highbrow. the ticket quote from the 1920 book by f. scott fitzgerald and it is i believe all harvard men are sissies like i used to be giving it a very pretentious, like a lot of us and extending about why i'm going to princeton. and there are -- and scott fitzgerald, we agree. so they finally got highbrow in this fight and they were banned from having this t-shirt because someone claimed this was meant to be an anti-gang slurs. this isn't the delegation. that is in the way that was met in the book. if it was all harvard men are gay like i use
in the future. the harvard business school last your did a competitiveness survey. they found higher education institutions or america's greatest asset. they found one of the highest concerns of the many leaders in business that they serve it was the state of k-12 education which was seen as a huge disadvantage in american competitiveness. students who are coming to college, 43% are not ready for college in one field or another. universities need to do considerable remedial work before they can even start the students on the treasury to what a college education should be. how do we begin to address the challenges that this has had a number of exciting innovations? they are trying to in able research, uniting that with business school faculty that shows how you lead an organization like a school district or school. and what they can add to train educational leaders who can transform systems. this has been a popular degree. it has wonderful candidates who go through its. this is just one contribution our school is making and others as well. we need across the country to have a unified approach t
he went to harvard because half of his class went from him to boston to harvard, and there were about 10% of the students were catholic and a much larger percentage from public schools in and around boston he still considered himself an insider. they didn't let him into some of their clubs. but that didn't bother him nearly as much as the fact that he was too slow to make the varsity baseball team. he got his letter but was never a starter. he graduated from harvard, and his life began she wanted to go banking and finance, and he discovered every door was closed to him because he was an irish catholic from each boston whose father had been a leader. his friends, his classmates got interviews, got jobs at the major banks, the major financial institutions. he does nothing. nothing. alana an answer, not an interview, nothing. she was still going to go into banking savitt took a soulful service exam and became an assistant bank examiner and he traveled around the state examining the books of the banks and learned more about the banks as he ever would have to make enough money so he could
the neighbors in potrero on harvard street. we have heard directly from the concerns through the community meeting around traffic, noise and parking. i think from the testimony you have already heard tonight sarah and lawrence take this very seriously. they are planners and as you saw from your planning packet, they have a plan to mitigate and be able to be a good neighbor in the potrero neighborhood. issues raised by michelle and cat, an additional consideration for the commission is what is state of children and families in san francisco? with only 13% of children in san francisco -- it's one of the smallest populations across the country. what kind of message are we sending for children and families who want to stay in san francisco and raise -- to be able to stay for generations? i am really proud of the san franciscans investing in public housing, which has passed around our parks, building infrastructure and to me another key fabric to that is children. in closing building a school isn't only a dream for sarah stein, but a dream for families to live and thrive in san francisco.
wins. randall with a team, high 16. the cardinal improve to 9-4. >> harvard was looking for its third straight victory but the crimson can play. there's allen crabbe, leads thepack twelve -- the pac-12 in scoring. harvard wins 67-62. cal falls to 8-4. >>> santa clara at dunk. with this dunk up by four. but duke would rally behind steph curry's you canner brother, seth. he had a career-he 31 points. the blue devils with the victory. santa clara falls to 11-3. >>> still to come, the college football bowl season is in full swing. a pair of pac-12 teams were in action today, and stanford >> on tuesday, stanford will play in it's 13th role bowl, the last time was in 1999 when it lost to wisconsin. the badgers red by monte ball will be the a opponent. this is the third straight -- second year they have been to the rose bowl and are hoping third is a charm. >> we know what we're here for, i told them to take advantage of all that's offered, for something for them to go do and enjoy it, but in the next few days we'll start dialing that down and get ready to play our best football game this ye
the equivalent of the social sciences at harvard. i worry about the kids that are getting literature or courses in universes' that didn't have the same level of prestige and cannot get jobs after words and are repaying those student loans. it is important if you have a good idea to be able to communicate it. we need to think about people's employability and not people that went to stanford and harvard and other kinds of schools and a great conditions where they can have a personal balance sheet that allows them to prosper in their lives. >> no question about that. everybody needs to think and to write. that is what you get from a liberal arts education. >> you have the terrible squeeze. harvard does a fantastic job. a kid will end up with $100,000 in debt. it is a terrible squeeze. >> some of the work being done to integrate and we talk about the dangers of universities and businesses getting together. one thing we can do is create the ability for the schools at all levels to teach kids things that local employers need to be employed. then teach them something about shakespeare and the constitu
of our most compelling discussions was with harvard business school professor, michael porter, whose new project aims to help american companies compete on the global stage. >> michael porter still teaches, he's, like, iconic. but i'm, like, a little person. he's a big deal. so now i'm at the table with him. >> professor. >> this is, like, wow! >> you wept to harvard business school? i would have never guessed. >> i know. >> keep it low. keep it low. >> not that there's anything wrong. not that there's anything wrong. >> yeah. very good to have you. >> on u.s. competitiveness, where do you come down on this? >> well, gosh, i hate to be -- >> you're going to be debbie downer, aren't you? >> -- off cycle, but this issue is actually way down the list in terms of the problems facing the american economy. harvard business school took on, about a year ago, a major initiative to really take a deep look at the u.s. economy, how we were doing, how we could explain the problems we're facing with job generation and so forth. and frankly, we came to the very unhappy conclusion that the succes facing
can that transform in cambridge and boston. secondly, we see it as a way to get harvard ideas and harvard teaching out to a broader world and way to accumulate a lot of data that can be an extraordinary resource for anybody who like to use that material to ask questions about the nature of human learning and how it ought to be structured. on the point about spreading learning to the rest of the world, i have a very moving reaction to one bit of data. one of the pilot courses. when i was in india, i met with people in india who were wanting to interact with harvard. there is a need for engagement with our schools public health. we have enormous challenges in that area. i was talking to these individuals about what kind of courses we might involve them in. this online course that i described steele has overall more than 40,000 students and 9000 of them come from india. last january i was thinking how can i put people together and what programs onemight we run? this is dazzling. i would like to get a map of where they all are in india. i do know based on another conversation last
asylum here in san francisco. he hasn't gotten s he is not here illegal. he's a harvard graduate as well. next year january 31 and i just been coming to city hall to try to get support for him as well, and that's pretty much all i have to sai. i would like him to speak for himself. >> i want to thank the commission for its work. this is my second time appearing at city hall. the first time i had the opportunity again to witness a session like this, and i want to thank everybody. i want to thank supervisor olague. i have read much about the commission work from the examiner, the san francisco examiner. like jamal and my case manager. i see supervisor mar and supervisor campos and i have been reading about san francisco and all about its developments on the san francisco examiner which as you know is a free newspaper, and i have been seeing all the work you are doing in my district where i live, bay district and bringing things there and cleaning up the navy yard and affordable housing and like jamal said i am trying to get asylum. i moved into this country in 1996 at harvard unive
was a student at harvard who had recently graduated and they were doing what they could to help the cause. saving their liberties against the forces of market fascism. >> he was studying at harvard at the time. what was his life trajectory at that point? >> he liked his four brothers and they had grown up in new jersey together and vermont where his family had had property for quite a long time. several generations. he went to prep school at st. paul's school, where he was distinguished as a student and a student leader. like all his brothers, they went to harvard. he was a good writer, known as a good writer. and when he went to war, he kept journals and wrote one of the letters, which i have hunted out and explored the story of what happened when he went to war. and i knew growing up that he had been killed. he was still very well remembered, he was killed in tunisia. that's pretty much all i knew about him except for what he looked like. about six years ago i decided that i was going to see what i could do to learn more about him. and that was the beginning of this journey of discovery
cancelled yet. >> things are getting a little bit more liberal at harvard. the university has approved the first student bondage club, raw story reports the club's constitution states there will never be any sexual contact. >> bill: not in class. amount club. >> this is a club. this is a college -- a college-sanction would club. all clubs have to be approved by the university. they say in the constitution there will never be any sexual contact of any kind during meetings. they only wanted to educate students about alternative sexual lifestyles. >> harvard university. >> why would you go the true and have no sexual contact? you just like wearing a ball gag in your mouth. >> not at all. not allowed. >> bill: i am not the good. a step in the right direction, but, you know, those liberal arts colleges. yeah. all right. man, the news hit yesterday afternoon like a bomb nuclear bomb here in washington, d.c. when the word got out that susan rice, the beleaguerred susan rice had decided, with the announcement at any rate that she did not want any longer want t
-span. monday, harvard university president drew faus sett immigration problems are a human rights issue. and he -- and expressed the need for reforms. this is about 40 minutes. >> s. washington is focused on the fiscal cliff, one might wonder why we are having a conference on around innovation. we have been focused on long- term competitiveness, making sure the united states is maintaining its edge in the global economy, and the role as an innovation economy to a central to the competitiveness, but that has not happened by happenstance. there are decisions in the public sector that have been critical to that success. as we look at the questions are wrong the united states, fiscal discipline and the fiscal cliff, or the curve, or whenever, the term, we wanted to make sure that we have some discussion about the investments we have made, and also the role of issues that are not always at the forefront. the vital role that america's universities have played, the fact that our places of higher learning are the best in the world and people from around the world want to come to be the next generation
they talk aboutment some went to harvard, so they must be so smart. we believe them, then, when they say, yes, we can. >> yes, we can. >> yes, we can. >> yes, we can. [cheers and applause] >> real life says they can't do things including free people. no, they can't. yes, they can pass a law, but the law does not solve the problem, but creates new ones. in my city last week, there were protests in front of mcdonalds. unions want fast workers paid more. the new "new york times" put thn the front page saying mcdonalds pays her $8, but she deserves $15 #. civil ights groups, union demands a higher living wage, and they may get it. [chanting] >> the big bad union like the big bad wolf like the government use force. if they want a $15 minimum, that's what employers must pay. that sounds good to people. everyone will get a raise. the problem comes from what is not seen. i can interview the guy who got a raise. i can't interview the guy who didn't open a mcdonalds because work rules were too onerous or those never offered a job because high union paid skills protected him out of a job. we don't
. he was the ultimate insider in boston latin. and even when he went to harvard, because half of his class went with him from boston latin to harvard and about 10% of the students were catholic and a much larger percentage from public schools in and around boston, he still considered himself an insider. there were bramens there, and they didn't let him into some of their clubs, but that didn't bother him nearly as much as the fact that he was too slow to make the varsity baseball team. he got his letter but was never a starter. he graduated from harvard, and his life began. he wanted to go into banking, into finance. and he discovered that every door was closed to him because he was an irish catholic from east boston whose father had been a ward leader. every door. his friends, his classmates who were not irish catholic got interviews, got jobs at the major banks, the major financial institutions. he got nothing. nothing. not an answer, not an interview, not a nothing. he was still going to go into banking, so he took a civil service exam and became an assistant bank examiner. and he
of this city and all the cities, the triumph of the city, that's the title of harvard economics professor ed glaeser's book. it's about what's made cities around the world great, about the challenges that they have had to overcome and still face. we're going to talk about b that in a few minutes in the special context of this city with our panel, and we'll take questions from you as well later. but, first, to launch us off with a presentation, here's the author, professor ed glaeser. [applause] >> thank you. thank you, bob. and thank you all so much for being here. i'm so enormously flattered that you've decided to take time out of your saturday afternoon to come and talk about, about cities. i'm also particularly grateful to the boston book festival for including this book. i, like i think every single one of you, love books, and i'm just thrilled to be part of this amazing thing that goes on here. well, um, let me start, let me start or with a portrait of america, and i call it a portrait to make it really clear from the very start that i have absolutely no aesthetic sense whatsoever. [lau
's and phd from harvard. c-span: and where are you getting your interest in political science along the way? where did it come from? >> guest: probably having parents that were civil rights activists in the '60s in the bay area. that was probably my initial interest. i saw their activism, and that was important. but also, i think i became interested in international affairs at spelman, in particular for s--from some courses that i took, and then harvard was a wonderful place to study international relations. the end of the cold war story became important to me later on in my graduate career when i took a job, to the dismay of my dissertation adviser, to do the research for george shultz's memoir and--out at stanford. c-span: why--why to the dismay? >> guest: oh, because it was such a huge project for some--someone who was working on her own dissertation, to take on another project, and--but i thought it was a great opportunity. c-span: how did that happen? >> guest: in 1989, i moved out to california to work with condi rice, who was my outside reader on my thesis committee, partly, and also
it on their own. columbia isn't clean. they get lots of government money too. harvard got $670 million. >> bill: those are grants to do specific projects not tied into who they hire. i don't have a beef with professor thurman. >> i do. we all know that. >> that's creepy and crazy. >> i watched kill. >> bill: bill he has a right -- you are mocking the man because of his daughter. he has a right to say it under the academic freedom. that's what we don't have a beef with we are not going to be hypocrites here. however, princeton hires a guy like singer. the guy who says sex with animals is okay and might be able to kill babies. >> bill: i think that's shameful but princeton is private and they can do it. however if singer or thurman comes into the university system paid for by you and me, that's a whole different matter. >> it does make it worse. ward churchill is an example of that state university. but what are we going to do? if we start to say we have got to have our guys in there, they will scream mccarthyism. >> what about affirmative action for conservative professors that you have to have
was the ultimate insider. he was the ultimate insider and even when he went to harvard because half of this class went to boston and there is about 10% of the students for catholic and a much larger percentage from public schools in and around boston. he still considered himself an end tighter. they were promised there and they didn't let him into some of the clubs, but that didn't bother him nearly as much of the fact that he was too slow to make the varsity baseball team. he got his letter but with every starter. he graduated from harvard and his wife began. he wanted to going to banking come finance and he discovered that every door was closed. an irish catholic -- [inaudible] his friends, his classmates who are not irish catholic that interviews, got jobs from major banks, major financial institution. we've got nothing. not an answer, not in interview, nothing. you were still going to go into banking. so we took a civil service exam and became assistant bank and traveled around the state, examining the books and learned more about tanks than he ever would have had he gone directly management
control groups says "the washington post." the firearms industry is like the harvard business school case of success, but after sandy hook, key investors like large retirement funds are now pulling their money out. they're questioning if it's all about profit. the nra's suggestion has been met with an avalanche of gun controlaed vok ats and i'll talk to the executive director of gun owners of america who says the nra has it exactly right and how to plan your trip around weather delays and snowstorms across the country. [ woman ] too weak. wears off. [ female announcer ] stop searching and start repairing. eucerin professional repair moisturizes while actually repairing very dry skin. the end of trial and error has arrived. try a free sample at eucerinus.com. everything about the oral-b power brush is simply revolutionary. our unique brush head cleans in three directions with up to 50% more brush movements than leading sonic technology. oral-b power brushes. go to oralb.com for the latest offers. can i still ship a gift in time for christmas? yeah, sure you can. great. where's your gift? u
minimum wage job. the program costs about as much as it costs to put a guy through harvard. you would think it's a failure. if f it were private sector we would be laughing. if it's a government program we must be they haven't spent enough money. when say to the student, i have one student who asked if it fails why does it persist. i thought it was a beautiful naive question. congressman around the country will say it's a feather in the cap. i voted for the job corp. that helped to bring a lot of helpful programs here to the state. what nobody ever asks how many people went through the program got employed in the field. like in alabama where i live farred number of years. i have a friend an economist who did the job training program. how many trained somebody for a job that he got in the state that year the answer was one person. one person came through the program. obviously there have 0 got to be better ways of doing this. we're never going crack through -- there's so much entrench bureaucracy we might say that it's a shame $1 out of my tax dollars go to this. who is going waste a b
and innovation can benefit the u.s. economy. speakers include gene sperling, harvard university president, and former congresswoman and portugal vice-president, susan molinari. - google vice-president, susan molinari. from the american enterprise institute, join us live, 5:30 p.m. eastern also here on c- span. president obama troubles monday to an auto plant in michigan to merge congress to extend tax breaks for 998% of americans.
. there was a chapter in a book written about how he got in harvard and basically they said academically unqualified and the father gave money to harvard and gets in to harvard and thinking of whether it east krystal's kid or toure's kid but does the right things growing up to position themselves in to harvard, how big of a problem is it buying a way in or legacies, you know, the children of alumni and maybe not that qualified, how many spots are they eating up from people who should be taking them? >> well, i don't think it's a huge problem because, frankly, i don't think most people have millions and millions of dollars to contribute to top schools. the truth is schools do survive based on, you know, how large their endowments are. schools can't improve their programs, private schools can't, without the funds to be able to, you know, create state of the art facilities, to hire top-notch teacher talent and in that way they care about whether alumni are contributing the school. i won't say that that hasn't made a difference in some cases but overall i think schools need to maintain the integrity of
believe in heaven? about 80% of americans do. but a harvard trained brain surgery wasn't so sure until he spent a week in a coma and came out with a description of the afterlife. here is terry moran with this encore presentation. >>> eben and holley alexander are at a high school soccer game cheering on their high school son bond. they are an american family with an extraordinary story. they have been touched by a medical miracle and maybe more. >> it was impossible after impossible after impossible. >> reporter: eben alexander survived a near-death experience and now carries the memory of what he says was a journey to heaven, a journey that all his scientific training can not explain. on november 10th, 2008, eben awoke with a searing headache. when holley checked on him he was having a tremendous seizure. >> i said say something and he didn't say anything. zblbt eben was rushed to the hospital where he was a neurosurgery. >> all we could make out was help and screaming. >> reporter: he had been stricken with a rare and virulent ecloy meningitis infection. >> i was trying to die. >> repor
to a professor at harvard who was also wilkins but it is a chicago, illinois republican as opposed to the democrat roger naacp. >>host: mary frances berry how did the administration change with the kennedy and johnson administration? >>guest: i then called the chapter about friends among friends because the commissioners all said he is a good solid democrats and now was the time. they did not know the bad bobby kennedy that i call him then, they were making fun of the commission. they are recommending this? there were not hostile to civil rights. the problem was the committees of congress were controlled by democrats from the south. mcclellan, and mississippi, they control the judiciary committee and judicial appointments. so it has been a friendly reception. but the administration would take the recommendations to incorporate them later on but intel and they were simply being polite that these people think we will do this. we cannot do this. so they found out they tried to cooperate but the independence that made them the independent voice was important and they should not try to
organizing to go to harvard. this time is so important in terms of the evolution of his search for identity, that it really consumed a lot of the book. it was earlier than i expected. there will be in a volume something, but this is the book now. the ark of the book is somewhat different. the title is somewhat different. the essence is the same. barack obama and how he recorded himself. >> host: so the book ends in 1989 as he is going off to boston, correct, to harvard law school? >> guest: yes. >> host: barack obama is filed going to make an appearance in your book, is it about halfway through the book lacks. >> guest: not halfway through. it's a 580 some page book. >> host: how did his parents meet? >> guest: well, his mother was 17. she was a freshman at the university of hawaii. >> host: i apologize. take it one step back. how did she get to hawaii? >> guest: her father, who had been a furniture salesman in mercer island, or in seattle, washington, he got a job selling furniture in honolulu. he was always looking over the next thing. moving west. he moved from kansas, california, spent
. harvard holds on to win, 67-62. the bears fall to 8-4. >> now, to football, stanford will try to cap a 11-2 season with a win over wisconsin in the rose bowl. badgers are just 8-5 but three of those losses did come in overtime. this is the third straight year they have been to the rose bowl. they lost the previous two. last one is oregon. wisconsin is hoping third time will be the charm. >> we like to play great defense. we don't know anything about that. whatever people say about point spreads, those don't matter. ever play comes down to the last possession and late in the fourth quarter. we know it will be a heck of a football game. >> abc7 sports anchor mike shumann will be pasadena to cover the rose bowl. watch his report starting on tuesday. >> bryce lost his brother when he shot over pair shoes. despite the loss he took place in the hunger bowl. in memory of his late bowl, rice had a great game running for 159 yards. sun devils led 21-0 after the first quarter. kelly threw four touchdowns. 62-28, they finish 8-5. >> it's really great. this is my last game, solid game. i went out wit
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 457 (some duplicates have been removed)